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The University of Chicago Medicine - Comer Children's Hospital

Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition Patient Stories

Each year, our experts provide care for patients with a wide range of conditions affecting the esophagus, stomach, intestines, liver and pancreas. Here are some of their stories: 

Eosinophilic Diseases

Pediatric Specialists Help Five-Year-Old Manage Rare Allergic Inflammatory Disease

A Young Boy's Journey with Eosinophilic Esophagitis
After experiencing difficulty swallowing, stomach pain and vomiting, five-year-old Drew Mastrino was diagnosed with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), a rare allergic reaction to food that causes inflammation and swelling in the esophagus. A team of specialists at the University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children's Hospital -- and Drew's favorite superhero -- helps him and his family to manage the chronic disease.

Gastroschisis

The McVay family.

Theo's Zest for Life
Theo McVay was born prematurely and with a severe form of gastroschisis, a birth defect in which the intestines extend outside of the body through an opening in the abdomen. He was transferred to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at the University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children's Hospital, where a multidisciplinary team of experts worked together to plan his treatment. After months in the NICU, doctors and nurses trained Theo's parents on his care so they could bring their young son home and help him enjoy life.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis)

Father and Daughter Fight Through Crohn's Disease 
After several years of medical treatment for Crohn's disease that offered little relief, Rick Strong turned to University of Chicago inflammatory bowel disease experts -- who offered him surgical and medical options to help control his disease. When Rick's daughter, Victoria, showed signs of Crohn's, the family again turned to the University of Chicago for care.

Liver Disease

After Lifesaving Surgery, Physicians Remove Baby from Liver Transplant List

On the Mend from Biliary Atresia 
Soon after Elizabeth Woodcock was born, a test showed abnormally high bilirubin levels in her blood. Concerned by the high levels of bilirubin and Elizabeth's low weight, Ruba Azzam, MD, performed a biopsy of Elizabeth's liver. When results suggested biliary atresia, a chronic and progressive liver disease, Azzam referred Elizabeth to Andrea Lo, MD, for surgery. Thanks to swift action and a comprehensive care plan, Elizabeth is now doing well and may never need a liver transplant.

Alsayegh family

Family Travels More Than 7,000 Miles for Father-to-Son Liver Transplant 
Omran Alsayegh and his wife, Manal, came to the University of Chicago Medicine from the United Arab Emirates in January 2007, desperate to help their two-year-old son, Humaid, who suffered from cholestatic liver disease. Thanks to a new liver and care from transplant experts, Humaid now lives a normal life.